Research could lead to better vaccines and new antivirals

Scientists have identified a new regulator of the innate immune response—the immediate, natural immune response to foreign invaders. The study suggests that therapeutics that modulate the regulator—an immune checkpoint—may represent the next generation of antiviral drugs, vaccine adjuvants, cancer immunotherapies, and treatments for autoimmune disease….

Scientists have identified a new regulator of the innate immune response—the immediate, natural immune response to foreign invaders. The study suggests that therapeutics that modulate the regulator—an immune checkpoint—may represent the next generation of antiviral drugs, vaccine adjuvants, cancer immunotherapies, and treatments for autoimmune disease….

Lack of oxygen, not excessive stimulation, cause for half of seizure-related brain damage in epilepsy

Neuronal degeneration is the most severe long-term consequence of repetitive seizures in patients with epilepsy, which until now was thought to be primarily caused by excitotoxicity, or over-stimulation of the neurons. New findings indicate hypoxia, or lack of oxygen, due to abnormal blood flow may be to blame for as much as half the neuronal death caused by the condition….

Neuronal degeneration is the most severe long-term consequence of repetitive seizures in patients with epilepsy, which until now was thought to be primarily caused by excitotoxicity, or over-stimulation of the neurons. New findings indicate hypoxia, or lack of oxygen, due to abnormal blood flow may be to blame for as much as half the neuronal death caused by the condition….

Sponge bacterium found to encapsulate arsenic drawn from environment

A new study sheds light on a unique biological model of arsenic detoxification. According to the new research, the Entotheonella bacterium that inhabits the Theonella swinhoei sponge is one of the only known cases of a bacterium protecting its host from metal poisoning….

A new study sheds light on a unique biological model of arsenic detoxification. According to the new research, the Entotheonella bacterium that inhabits the Theonella swinhoei sponge is one of the only known cases of a bacterium protecting its host from metal poisoning….

Woodstoves are good for the soul, bad for the heart

The risk of acute myocardial infarction for the elderly living in and around small cities is increased by air pollution caused by biomass burning from woodstoves….

The risk of acute myocardial infarction for the elderly living in and around small cities is increased by air pollution caused by biomass burning from woodstoves….

Doctors should discuss herbal medication use with heart disease patients

Physicians should be well-versed in the herbal medications heart disease patients may take to be able to effectively discuss their clinical implications, potential benefits and side effects—despite a lack of scientific evidence to support their use, according to a review paper….

Physicians should be well-versed in the herbal medications heart disease patients may take to be able to effectively discuss their clinical implications, potential benefits and side effects—despite a lack of scientific evidence to support their use, according to a review paper….

Taking aim at a key malaria molecule

A team of biological engineers has developed a method to measure levels of heme, a critical iron-containing molecule, inside the parasite that causes malaria. This could eventually help scientists develop better drugs to combat the disease….

A team of biological engineers has developed a method to measure levels of heme, a critical iron-containing molecule, inside the parasite that causes malaria. This could eventually help scientists develop better drugs to combat the disease….

How your brain makes articles go viral

Activity in the self-related, mentalizing, and positive valuation regions of the brain combine unconsciously in our thoughts to determine what we want to read and share, such that brain scans from a small group of people can predict large-scale virality, say researchers. New fMRI research reveals what goes on in the brain when people decide to share news articles with others. The researchers then used this neural activity in 80 people to accurately predict the virality of 80 New York Times healt…

Activity in the self-related, mentalizing, and positive valuation regions of the brain combine unconsciously in our thoughts to determine what we want to read and share, such that brain scans from a small group of people can predict large-scale virality, say researchers. New fMRI research reveals what goes on in the brain when people decide to share news articles with others. The researchers then used this neural activity in 80 people to accurately predict the virality of 80 New York Times healt…

New study tests potential treatment to combat Gulf War Illness

An estimated 25 percent of the 700,000 troops who engaged in the fierce battles of Operation Desert Storm and related Gulf War combat during 1990-91 are fighting a different, but relentless foe: Gulf War illness. A new study tests potential treatment to combat Gulf War illness….

An estimated 25 percent of the 700,000 troops who engaged in the fierce battles of Operation Desert Storm and related Gulf War combat during 1990-91 are fighting a different, but relentless foe: Gulf War illness. A new study tests potential treatment to combat Gulf War illness….